Conspiracy Theories are Fun and Magical

    Great title for a long term thread, so I am stealing it with this first example:

    Comments

    Wow. "these children are being tortured... murdered and eaten." The important question here is how are they cooked? I was hanging out with a couple of cannibals and one said, "I caught one of those black robed guys and he wasn't very tasty." "How did you cook him?" "I boiled him in a pot with some potatoes and vegetables." "Ah, that was your problem. He was a fry-er (friar)."


    Quit asking so many questions. Forget the dead and eaten for now, we gotta save those still alive. If you would just sign the petition, the White House would get on it and the Marines forensics would figure it all out.


    How can people eat pizza in a time like this - no compassion for victims?


    Well if it's a traditional pizza it's probably ok. But then you'd have to only use the meat from Italian children.


    But Italy's down to <2 children per family - it's not like the old days when 1 or 2 wouldn't be missed - prosciutto in short supply.


    Conspiracy theorists keep their Ginsburg death claims alive

    By Jacqueline Thomsen @ TheHill.com, April 6

    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been keeping busy since her cancer surgery in late December: She has returned to the bench to hear oral arguments, authored opinions and even made a few public appearances outside the courtroom.

    But conspiracy theorists aren’t buying it, with some arguing that the 86-year-old justice has been dead for weeks and that Democrats are covering it up to stop President Trump from filling her seat.

    The Supreme Court has been bombarded with Twitter users demanding evidence that Ginsburg is still alive, while some online videos allege her public appearances have been manufactured.

    There are also claims that audio of her from recent Supreme Court oral arguments has been doctored and is nothing more than phrases pieced together from earlier recordings of her remarks [....]


    It's so ridiculous. I found this picture of Ginsberg at work in her office. Alive and well.

     


    you so bad. devil


    That's not fair - I found an old picture of her and she's aged pretty well:


    Where is #RuthBaderGinsburg? pic.twitter.com/6fP78sWs9e

    — James (@FloGrownPatriot) April 28, 2019

    More excuses. Where’s Ruth? #qanon https://t.co/RNaD6uGn9Z

    — Patriot Lady Loves METAL (@Microsingular) April 29, 2019

    Where in the flying fuck is Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

    — HillaryClinton.net [AE] (@HCDotNet) May 5, 2019

     


    Last I heard she's on maternity leave - think she gets 3 months, though if like Europe, could get up to 2 years for 1st child.


    this fits your theory: she has scheduled to shuffle off to Buffalo in August. Of course that could also all be part of the ruse.

    Edit to add: whatever they are hiding, the Swedish minister of foreign affairs appears to be in on it.


    That's it - they're deciding where to extradite Assange first, Sweden or US.


    Meanwhile under the White House (which is not real but a hologram for Area 51) there are Japanese dogs, cats and baboons cooking rice....


    American Chronicles: What’s New About Conspiracy Theories?

    Outsiders have always had a weakness for paranoid fantasies. Now our leaders are conspiracists, too. 

    By Elizabeth Kolbert @ NewYorker.com, April 15

    [....] America has always had a weakness for paranoid fantasies. According to some historians, the Founding Fathers were moved to write the Declaration of Independence by groundless fears of a British plot. “Conspiracy Theories in American History,” a two-volume encyclopedia, runs from “Abolitionism” to “zog.” (zog, an acronym used by survivalists, is shorthand for the “Zionist Occupied Government,” which, the encyclopedia explains, refers to an “international Jewish conspiracy to undermine U.S. sovereignty and true Christianity.”) In between are some three hundred entries, including “Black Helicopters,” “Contrails,” “Illuminati,” “Moon Landings,” “Pan Am 103,” and “Roswell.”

    In this context, Pizzagate and QAnon could be considered madness as usual—just two late-alphabet entries in the annals of national crankdom. But is that all there is to it? Or are deeper, darker forces at work? A confirmed conspiracist now occupies the White House and, “no collusion” notwithstanding, there’s evidence that an international conspiracy put him there. Coincidence? To paraphrase Q, perhaps it’s time to “expand our thinking.”

    Russell Muirhead and Nancy L. Rosenblum are professors of government at, respectively, Dartmouth and Harvard. A few years ago, they found themselves, in their words, “startled into thought.” Yes, they knew, crazy ideas were a fixture of American life. But not this crazy. “The subject required more detailed and thoughtful interpretation,” the two write at the beginning of “A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy.”

    “Classic” conspiracy theories, according to Muirhead and Rosenblum, arise in response to real events—the assassination of John F. Kennedy, say, or the terrorist attacks of September 11th. Such theories, they argue, constitute a form of explanation, however inaccurate they may be. What sets theories like QAnon apart is a lack of interest in explanation. Indeed, as with the nonexistent child-trafficking ring being run out of the nonexistent basement, “there is often nothing to explain.” The professors observe, “The new conspiracism sometimes seems to arise out of thin air.”

    The constituency, too, has shifted. Historically, Muirhead and Rosenblum maintain, it’s been out-of-power groups that have been drawn to tales of secret plots. Today, it’s those in power who insist the game is rigged, and no one more insistently than the so-called leader of the free world [.....]

    the piece continues at length including reviews and summaries of several other books on topic. 



    This is actually a very interesting piece not just on an inspirational white supremacy wingnut conspiracy, but also the commonalities of "magical thinking" between recent anti-Semitic and anti-Muslim nut cases:


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